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04/05/2012

Comments

Colette File

Dear Lynn,

I so relate to your feelings about coming home. Between 1975 and 2009 I followed my husband who worked for the State Department around the world. We lived an average of two or three years in various countries. We are now retired in Fearrington Village, a small village just south of Chapel Hill, NC. It was a truly wonderful life, but the only drawback is that we are not "home." The feeling of being home was lost when I left my French Canadian home town to join the Foreign Service and was sent to Moscow as my first assignment in 1976. I came "home" after three years for Christmas, only to realize that yes, you can come home again, but things will never be the same. The intimacy of the daily life with your loved ones will never be as it was, and they will never understand that your love of travels was stronger than family ties.

Colette

patricia schiavone

Hello there! It is sooooooo true what you wrote about being "shared" between two countries: I have lived in the USA for the past 23 years, and between the two, "mon coeur balance" each time. And the older I get, the more melancholic I feel about "home" which is France.
By the way for "cozy" we use "douillet".
Warm regards,
Patricia.

Harriet

Many of us dream of living in France, even if only for a short time as compared to you and Ron. Loved reading your post today.

I also clicked on the link regarding your immersion school experience. I tried some lessons in Paris a couple of years ago and nearly every student in the class was Asian. I had great respect for our teacher who could actually understand their accent. I think an immersion program like Villefranche-sur-Mer is the way to go. Perhaps one day, I'll try it.

Bella Michelle

As one who has moved around a bit (only in the US) I do understand your feelings. We learn to make home about those around us. Though, as a Southerner....the South is home for me in a way that no other region has been. Love your insights!

Julie F in St. Louis, MO

I was out of my hometown and my state for several years while earning my succession of degrees. I came home fairly often and called, but as each year passed I felt more and more out of the loop because I wasn't involved in the weekly family events and conversations. Now that I've been fully "home" for over 20 years, I still feel a bit out of the loop because a new family dynamic had developed for the ten or so years I was gone. Even though I'm in France for only 4-6 weeks each summer, I have that same feeling that I've missed so much that I'll never catch up on. But I'll never stop traveling and am still counting on someday having a place of my own for extended visits to France. However, I know that it will not be my way to move there all together.

Rachel M

After 25+ years in Texas my local friends try to tell me that I am now "an honorary Texan" or some such. I thank them politely and say no, I'm a Pennsylvanian... even though I've lived here longer than I lived there. Hmmm... something about where the heart is, I guess? Love your photos as always... thank you!

Sandra Vanw

What a lovely essay,thought provoking, so heartfelt and true it seems Lynn. I agree that home is where the heart is and that the heart can also love to travel. Wherever I am, my husband now of fifteen years is home to me after awhile to a large extent. I have been blessed to live in a number of wonderful countries over the years as well and seem to make each place "home' for that period of time.
Thanks for sharing your experiences, wisdom and joie de vivre...not to mention the fab recipes with all of us.

vicki archer

Lynn,

I understand so well what you write... I consider 'home' to be a multiple these days... but as time goes on europe is more and more where I feel at home... Lovely post... xv

Mary James

Lynn....I can relate to what you are saying...when I am in the States, I miss France and when I am in France I miss the States.......we have so much in common....I have a home in North Carolina but spend many months in France....I, too, spent a month at Institut de Francais in 2002 and adored it...would take nothing for that experience.....Perhaps we can meet at some point, I am in the Var most of the time (Les Arcs s/Argens) and otherwise, the Vaucluse. I enjoy your blog very much....

Mel

It's Le Jardin du Luxembourg for me. Home sweet home whenever I'm there or close enough to walk which is pretty much all of Paris:) Even some of the trees are my old friends now.

Mel

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